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2014 Elderton Shiraz

This Elderton Shiraz (remember say it with jazz hands), found at Waterfront Wine and Spirits

Like all Australian Shiraz's the wine is fruit forward, but more subtle than I thought it would be. It's actually lower in alcohol than a lot of Shiraz's....it being ONLY 14.5% abv! Remember most Shiraz's are even higher than this, with some being well over even 15%, take for instance Mollydooker.


This wine is very well balanced, and has nice ripeness in the fruit, but a subtle transition from start to finish. The wine is higher in acidity as well, so it would make for a great food wine. The vines are also very old, as phylloxera did not have much of an infestation in Australia. The vines used to make this wine are 21-122 years old (and that was in 2014!) There is an oak effect on this wine, but it's influence is felt more in texture than flavor. The oak used is mostly 2nd and 3rd fills, most oak is considered neutral by the 4th fill. So there is some influence, but not as much. Shiraz is also a grape that can stand to hold up to first fill oak, so the fact that this is 2nd or 3rd fill leads it to be less influenced by the oak because of the power of he grape.


The look is a pretty brick color, that is opaque in the center, and shows a little clearness around the edge of the wine, which is indicative of its age. There are some purple hues as well, but the red indicates a warmer climate. There are fast running legs as well and with the scent of alcohol indicates a higher abv wine....14.5%


The scent is of cherry cola, red raspberry, milk chocolate that leads into subtle tobacco. I also smell mossy floor in a cedar forest, button mushroom, and lavender.


The taste is of bright cherries, a hint of dark chocolate with tart black-raspberries, a little black pepper, lightly toasted coffee, and my favorite olives....queen olives!



Overall this wine is very smooth and can be drunk on is its own or if you want to see it change then add food into the mix. And don't be afraid of the capped wine, it's a standard now for Australian wines. It's their preferred method of sealing their wines since the 90s! Go Australia for being ahead of the curb.